These pieces are fit for a king or queen

Originally intended to conserve warmth and offer privacy, canopy beds are now beloved for their sumptuous design. These beds, typically four-posters, feature fabric draped over the top and on all sides, often finished with tassels or other details to add drama. From a simple, sheer surround to an over-the-top lit à la polonaise, these canopy beds from the AD archives make a good night’s sleep more luxurious than ever.

Cole Park, the manor that designer Anouska Hempel shares with her husband, Sir Mark Weinberg, in the countryside of Wiltshire, England, dates from the mid-16th century. In the master bedroom, a J. Robert Scott stripe is used for the ebony-and-gilt canopy bed.

For her English manor home, designer Anouska Hempel conceived the Oriel Room’s bed, which is wrapped in burlap, velvet, and rope cord.

At Easton Neston, in Northamptonshire, England—the 1702 house by Nicholas Hawksmoor owned by fashion designer Leon Max, who restored it with Ptolemy Dean Architects and Spencer-Churchill Designs—the Tapestry Bedroom features a George III mahogany bed with a custom-printed linen canopy; the carpet is a 19th-century Sultanabad.

Designer Peter Dunham worked with Steve Tisch on the redecoration of his 1932 Paul Williams house in Beverly Hills, California. The hand-carved canopy bed in the pink bedroom is by Hollywood at Home; a vintage suzani covers the headboard, and the bedding is by Deborah Sharpe Linens.

Top trends and solutions Kitchen

We kick off each year at the annual Kitchen and Bath Industry Show, exploring the latest introductions from top brands and designers that will refresh your home. From innovative materials to color and hardware trends, there is no shortage of new ideas to take away and apply to your own kitchen or bath. Whether you’re ready for a renovation or just craving a quick fix for an old room, find inspiration in the most exciting trends that caught our eye at the show.

Matte Black Trade in typical chrome, bronze, or stainless-steel finishes for sleek matte black, seen on everything from faucets to outdoor kitchens and window finishes. Clockwise from top: Free-standing outdoor kitchen made with Dekton by Cosentino for Brown Jordan, brownjordanoutdoorkitchens.com; Vettis closed-spout single-handle sink faucet by Brizo.

Industrial Touches Textured knurling details give a modern, craftsman-like quality to faucets and hardware. Knurled lever industrial lever handle by Brizo, brizo.com, and Italian Campo U-spout lavatory faucet by ROHL.

Color While gray dominated color schemes last year, bright hues are in for 2017, as seen in appliances, cabinets, and tile. Clockwise from top left: 6th Avenue tiles by Walker Zanger, walkerzanger.com; Amora vanity in navy by Ronbow, ronbow.com; Crown vent hood by Best, bestrangehoods.com; Quartz Luxe sink in Maraschino by Elkay, elkay.com; outdoor grill in prince by Hestan.

A Beautiful and Practical Design Practice

Cork has taken a few stops on its winding journey to showstopping interior design element: From the wine industry as bottle-stoppers (its most common and most lucrative use), then to badminton shuttlecocks and bulletin boards, next to a purely functional use in architecture as sub-flooring and insulation, and finally the walls, ceilings and floors in the homes featured in AD. The woody material’s pragmatic use in architecture is well deserved because of its elastic, cellular structure, its thermal-regulating and soundproofing qualities, and its natural resistance to fire, but it’s the cork’s natural warm hue and subtly dappled texture that are the secret to its modern design success. The versatile material can be dyed or painted (and still maintain its speckled look), it can be applied to walls and ceilings, and its inherent durability make it a prime choice for floors. Here, AD explores the varied uses of cork in spaces like one of Seth Meyers’s dressing rooms, a summer house designed by Thom Filicia, and the modernist home of GQ‘s Fred Woodward.

Designed by Ashe + Leandro, a dressing room backstage at Late Night: Seth Meyers features the warm, natural texture of a cork wall covering by Wolf-Gordon. The space, which also boasts an overhead cork pendant light made by Benjamin Hubert, is livened up with a bright-red sofa, colorful artwork, and a lime green floral arrangement.

The striking black cabinetry and stainless-steel appliances are balanced with the softer, more natural tones of cork flooring by DuroDesign in this Hudson Valley home. Known as Obercreek Farm, the countryside residence has been in the family of financier Alex Reese for six generations and was renovated by his wife, architect Alison Spear.

The Exclusive Sea HOme Design

Sitting on 425 acres of verdant land in Vero Beach, Florida, is the luxury residential community of Windsor. It was founded in 1989 by Canadian businessman W. Galen Weston and his philanthropist wife, Hilary Weston, the former lieutenant governor of Ontario. The Westons had been searching for a more permanent warm-weather home for themselves and their children after renting a retreat in the Bahamas. At the recommendation of Mr. Weston’s father, they chose Florida, and Vero Beach was the perfect locale for their dream seaside village. After building a couple of homes and a private polo field (Mr. Weston is an avid fan of the sport) for themselves, they enlisted Andrés Duany and Elizabeth Plater-Zyberk to design Windsor in the New Urbanism style of living, making it a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood with a focus on community and public spaces.

Windsor comprise 350 palatial homes—Anglo-Caribbean residences designed by power hitters such as AD100 firm Jacobsen Architecture and Merrill, Pastor & Colgan Architects. Meanwhile, residents include the likes of the Swarovskis, tennis player Ivan Lendl, businessman Pete Peterson, and of course the Westons. As you cruise around on a golf cart or bike your way through palm tree–lined streets, the vibe is Charleston meets Bermuda meets the Bahamas—it’s pristine, it’s manicured, it’s downright beautiful. Aside from an upcoming 2,000-square-foot wine cellar and tasting room, we take a look at all of the details that have us wanting to live in this exclusive community.

For the avid golfer, in addition to an 18-hole links-style course designed by Robert Trent Jones, there is also a 400-yard driving range and 6,000-square-foot putting green on-site.

Not only are the eight tennis courts designed by Wimbledon champion and fashion sneaker icon Stan Smith, they are also lined with walls of fragrant jasmine that act as an amazing backdrop in the warmer months.

Smart Home Products

With the popularity of smart speakers like the Amazon Echo and Google Home on the rise comes an influx of other products designed to make your home a little smarter. Whether you want some extra help in the kitchen or a way to monitor your pets when you aren’t home, there is a smart home product for all of your needs. From a refrigerator equipped with a touchscreen for looking up recipes to a sleep machine that analyzes your bedroom to create a “sound blanket,” these seven devices will take your home to the next level in 2017.

With features like two-way talk and one-way video, smart visitor detection, and notifications right to your phone, Vivint’s doorbell camera makes knowing who’s at your front door easy, whether you’re upstairs or out of town. Monthly plans start at $40.

Master the sous vide method with the Anova Precision Cooker. Easily attachable to any pot, the device allows for flavorful, expertly cooked meals every time by using temperature control. Download Anova’s app for tips and hundreds of recipes for every skill level; $149.

Designed for light sleepers, Nightingale works with the acoustics of your room and your existing sleeping conditions (like snoring) to diffuse sound and create white noise for better slumber. Available in February; preorder for $249.